Compendium, 19(7): 664, July 1998

Compendium, 19(7): 664, July 1998

6 Years Follow-up on Cerinate Porcelain Veneers
— Nash, R.W.

The step-by-step procedure is presented for treating a patient with Cerinate porcelain veneers using a minimal tooth preparation technique and bonding with Ultra-Bond resin.  In addition to images of the step-by-step treatment procedure, images of before treatment, immediately post treatment, and at a six-year follow-up are presented.  

The six-year follow-up results are completely favorable with excellent gingival health and no change in the shade or the condition of the veneers.

 

 

Esthetic Dentistry Update, 1(1):2, April 1990

Esthetic Dentistry Update, 1(1):2, April 1990

The Esthetic Repair of Metal Margins on Metal-Ceramic Crowns Using Etched Porcelain Cervical Shields
— Strassler, H.E., Weiner, S.

The difficulties of successfully repairing the fractured porcelain of porcelain fused to metal fixed prostheses is described.  When fractured porcelain involves the gingival margin of a crown, then the repair may involve bonding to porcelain, and metal, and root dentin.  The merits of Den-Mat products for bonding to these surfaces are explained.  

A clinical case report is presented in which a Cerinate porcelain “shield” (a partial veneer) is bonded over the facial surface of a tooth root and a crown with fractured porcelain at the gingival.  The procedure is simple to perform and the results are excellent. 

 

 

St. Bartholomew’s and the Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry, April 2000

St. Bartholomew’s and the Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry, April 2000

Flexural Strength Optimization of a Leucite Reinforced Glass Ceramic
— Cattell, M.J., Chadwick, T.C., Knowles, J.C., Clarke, R.L., Lynch, E.

The purpose of this study was to process a ceramic material with a fine leucite particle size using hot pressing techniques, to increase the flexural strength, reliability, and ease of use. Cerinate Pressable Porcelain exhibited significantly higher biaxial flexural strength than Empress®Pressable Porcelain. It was concluded that Cerinate can be pressed in different press furnaces without compromising its superior strength.

 

 

Contemporary Aesthetics and Restorative Practice, 84, January, 2002

Contemporary Aesthetics and Restorative Practice, 84, January, 2002

Porcelain Veneers: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

A brief history of the development of modern porcelain veneer technology is presented.  The unique strength of Cerinate porcelain is the basis for the conservative concept of veneers with little or no tooth preparation.  Also, the ability to bond veneers over existing metal, ceramic, or composite resin substrates is mentioned.

A clinical case is described to demonstrate the technique for veneers with no preparation of the teeth.  Ultra-Bond is used as the resin cement for the veneers.  Very successful results are obtained with a completely straight forward and easy-to-perform technique.

 

 

Journal of Esthetic Dentistry, 1(4):126, July/August, 1989

Journal of Esthetic Dentistry, 1(4):126, July/August, 1989

Clinical Evaluation of Porcelain Laminate Veneers: A Four-Year Recall Report
— Jordan, R.E, Suzuki, M., Boksman, L.

72 Cerinate porcelain veneers in 24 adolescents and young adult patients are evaluated over a period of 4 years.  The teeth were bleached and prepared with a conservative chamfer technique.  The veneers were cemented with Ultra-Bond resin cement.  

The veneers received 100% alpha ratings (the most favorable ratings) for color stability, abrasive wear resistance, surface texture, gingival response, postoperative sensitivity, and secondary caries.  The authors concluded that: “All parameters considered, the Cerinate porcelain veneers performed excellently over the 4-year recall period.”

 

 

Dentistry Today, April 2003

Dentistry Today, April 2003

No-Preparation Porcelain Veneers
— Malcmacher, L.

This article discusses the benefits of porcelain LUMINEERS that do not require the removal of sensitive tooth structure and produce no post-operative sensitivity. The three case reports used Cerinate Porcelain LUMINEERS and all required no tooth reduction. Each case report used LUMINEERS for different restoration purposes: 

1- Aesthetic smile improvement (linguoverted with discolored)
2- Instant orthodontics
3- Aesthetic smile improvement (bruxism).

 

 

DentalTown, May 2003

DentalTown, May 2003

Using Rembrandt Veneers in my Daily Practice
— Ouellet, D.

This article describes two case studies where Cerinate LUMINEERS (Rembrandt) are used with little to no tooth preparation. Both cases were examples of when it is necessary or not necessary to modify (prepare) teeth—standard veneer replacement and cuspid-guided occlusion with bonded porcelain. 

The end result showed a dramatic improvement in proportion and tooth positioning in Case 1. After an 11-year recall, the LUMINEERS in Case 2 showed no debonding and complete patient satisfaction.

 

 

 DentalTown, August 2003

DentalTown, August 2003

Cuspid-and anterior-guided occlusion achieved with Cerinate Porcelain withstands test of time.
— Ibsen, R.L.

This article reviews a case of Cerinate Porcelain LUMINEERS placed 14 years ago on a patient with significant wear of his enamel, showing exposed dentin and cupping in the incisally-eroded areas. Minimal reduction of tooth structure was performed only to create clearance between the mandibular and maxillary teeth. 

The placement of Cerinate LUMINEERS created anterior disclusion to compliment cuspid-guided disclusion. Fourteen years later, the Cerinate Porcelain LUMINEERS have performed well. Wear of the natural tooth structure has been stopped and the teeth were ultimately strengthened.

 

 

Compendium, October 2003

Compendium, October 2003

A New Fiber Post for Aesthetic Dentistry
— Strassler, H.E. and Cloutier, P.C.

This case study shows the use of a fiber-reinforced post to strengthen the maxillary left central incisor, along with the placement of Cerinate all-ceramic crowns to improve the appearance of the maxillary teeth. Cerinate, a fired feldspathic porcelain, was chosen for its masquing ability, since the patient’s teeth were tetracycline stained. 

The etched porcelain crowns and LUMINEERS were treated with Cerinate Prime®* and a resin adhesive, Tenure S*. Tenure MP* was applied to the crown preparation, and Ultra-Bond Quik®* was used to cement the crown in place with a 20-second LED light cure. The author stresses the need for practitioners to understand the chemistry and instructions of the dental materials to make the best choice for each clinical situation. *Den-Mat Corporation.

 

 

A Continuing Education Journal, 84:18, 2003

A Continuing Education Journal, 84:18, 2003

Repairing Porcelain-Metal Restorations
— Strassler, H.E.

Many patients, especially older patients, have porcelain fused to metal fixed prosthetics in which the porcelain has become worn or fractured, but the prosthesis is in otherwise good condition. Replacement of the prosthetics is usually a relatively high cost procedure, and frequently disruptive to the teeth and surrounding tissues. 

Fortunately, modern technology provides the possibility of successful porcelain repairs by allowing bonding of composite resin materials to porcelain and to underlying metal superstructures if exposed.  A clinical case report is described in which a Den-Mat micro etcher was used both on metal and porcelain, followed by Den-Mat GoldLink®and Cerinate Prime®on the metal and porcelain respectively. 

Den-Mat TetraPaque® was also used as an opaquer on the metal. Den-Mat Virtuoso®Sculptable was applied as the restorative composite resin.  The opposing occlusion was modified slightly to avoid excessive occlusal stresses on the repaired area.  The repair can be expected to provide good service for many years.

 

 

The Dental Advisor. Volume 22, Number 4, May 2005

The Dental Advisor. Volume 22, Number 4, May 2005

Clinical Evaluations

Clinical consultants gave LUMINEERS BY CERINATE a 5 plus award as well as Editor’s Choice for ninety-five restorations that were placed and evaluated at insertion in 25 patients. Comments include, “100% of restorations received from the laboratory were rated very good to excellent;” “All restorations fabricated exhibited excellent aesthetics.”

 

 

Dental Economics, 95(8):82, August, 2005

Dental Economics, 95(8):82, August, 2005

Ask Dr. Christensen
— Christensen, G. J.

The merits of minimal tooth preparation or no tooth preparation for porcelain veneers in comparison to deep preparation into dentin are discussed.  Among the advantages are the avoidance of tooth sensitivity and the avoidance of debonding of the veneers, as well as no need for anesthesia and no need for temporaries. Accordingly, the procedure is easier, faster, and better for both the patient and the dentist.

 

 

Biological Therapies in Dentistry, 21(2):5, April/May, 2006

Biological Therapies in Dentistry, 21(2):5, April/May, 2006

Evidence-Based Veneers: LUMINEERS
— Ciancio, S.G.

A review of studies on porcelain veneers is provided.  The results of the studies summarized are very supportive of the LUMINEERS concept, which is based on minimal preparation, or no preparation, of the teeth.

 

 

Dental Economics, 95(9):144, September, 2005

Dental Economics, 95(9):144, September, 2005

Ask Dr. Christensen
— Christensen, G. J.

Treatment options are discussed for a teenager with some discoloration and pitting of the enamel of the maxillary anterior teeth.  Deeply cut tooth preparations for porcelain veneers are not recommended especially because of the likelihood of causing pulpal sensitivity or pulpal necrosis in a young person.

Suggested alternatives are bleaching with micro abrasion, composite resin veneers, or porcelain veneers with minimal tooth preparation or no tooth preparation as recommended in accordance with the Den-Mat® LUMINEERS concept.

 

 

CRA Newsletter, Volume 30, Issue 3, March, 2006

CRA Newsletter, Volume 30, Issue 3, March, 2006

Upper Anterior Veneers - State of the Art

Cementation techniques are described for various types of tooth preparations for veneers ranging from preparations all on enamel to preparations with more than 50% dentin.

Ultra-Bond®Plus was rated “excellent” (the highest rating) for color match, was found to have no color change at one week, had the highest flowability (56mm) and was among the lowest in film thickness. 

 

 

DentalTown, 7(4):72, April, 2006

DentalTown, 7(4):72, April, 2006

What We Do for the Ones We Love
— Weinberg, S.

The concept of a natural tendency to prefer conservative treatment procedures for loved ones is asserted.  A clinical case history is described in which a dentist treats his son with LUMINEERS because natural tooth structure is preserved. 

The dentist and the son expected the cosmetic result to be a compromise, but were elated because the cosmetic results were truly excellent.  Before and after pictures of the patient are provided to illustrate the highly successful results.

 

 

The Dental Advisor. Volume 23, Number 3, April 2006

The Dental Advisor. Volume 23, Number 3, April 2006

LUMINEERS®BY CERINATE®

One hundred fifty-six Cerinate porcelain restorations were placed in 35 patients. These included 34 anterior crowns and 122 veneers.  The veneers were placed by both the minimal preparation technique and by conventional techniques. Restorations were rated for a period of up to 30 months and on a 1 to 5 rating scale. 

Clinical consultants awarded the best rating of 5 stars (excellent).  Comments from the consultants included “A perfect solution for peg laterals,” “Combination cases of crowns and veneers look fantastic,” and “Beautiful aesthetics”

 

DentalTown, 4(4):32, April, 2003

DentalTown, 4(4):32, April, 2003

Higher strength veneers offer more restorative options for dentists and their patients
— Ibsen, R.L.

A clinical case is reported whereby Cerinate porcelain veneers are elected as a treatment alternative to the use of full crowns or adult orthodontics. The high strength of Cerinate porcelain and the use of Ultra-Bond as the bonding resin make it possible to use a conservative technique with minimal recontouring of the teeth. 

The advantages of the technique include conservation of tooth structure, no need for anesthesia, no need for temporaries and a completely successful result that is obtained simply and expediently.

 

 

Private Dentistry, 10(9):69, November, 2005

Private Dentistry, 10(9):69, November, 2005

Novel porcelain laminate preparation approach driven by a diagnostic mock-up
— Magne, P., Belser, U.

The complexities and time consuming nature of preparing teeth for porcelain veneers are presented.  The advantages of a technique with no tooth preparation or only minimal tooth preparation are inherent in the text of this article.